A Different Approach to Building Science

News

This article by Allison Bailes of Energy Vanguard sums up Ellison Building Company's philosophy on building homes in Wilmington.

The big picture of home performance

Naturally, you might go to Google (or But-It's-Not-Google for some of you) for the answer. When I typed the question in this morning, I found the definition above from my friend Eric George's company website. That gives us a great starting point.

New York Times publishes another article about passive house

The Passive House in New York

Video: Superinsulation Doesn't Work if the Windows Leak

Posted in: video

Here is a video featuring the Grandmaster of building science, Joe Lstiburek, explaining why it so important to properly air-seal windows and how to do it.  This guy really knows what he's talking about.

Ellison Building Company featured in Salt Magazine

The Passive House: What It Is and Why You Should Care

By Mariana Pickering*

The term “passive” is getting thrown around almost as frequently as the word “green” these days. But what does it actually mean?  And how does the all-encompassing adjective differ from the measurable standards of the capitalized Passive House?

I’ve mentioned before that the truth of green building is in the details. Here’s how to understand the vocabulary and the implied meanings in the world of passive design.

Wilmington's First Passive House

By Mariah Hamrick

Lucien Ellison has felt a responsibility to live as sustainably as possible since an ecology course opened his eyes in college, but all it took was one beautiful view to inspire him to spend years building a house in line with one of the strictest green building standards in the world.

Ellison and his wife Jane lived only one mile away on Towles Road, but when they saw the property on Quail Run Road for the first time, they were blown away. Private and peaceful with a stunning view of Hewlett’s Creek framed by two sprawling, centuries-old live oaks, the couple knew they had to live there — and more importantly, they had to build a house worthy of the view.

'Passive' home meets top energy-efficiency goals

By Wayne Faulkner

The striking 5,700-square-foot house sits on the water amid huge live oaks off Greenville Loop Road.

Its mid-century modern style sets it apart from its more traditional neighbors, but what makes it truly unique isn't readily apparent to the casual observer.

The home of builder Lucien Ellison of Ellison Building Co. is the only "passive" house in the Wilmington area. In fact there are only four in North Carolina, Ellison said as he spoke Thursday afternoon to a tour sponsored by the Cape Fear Green Building Alliance.